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CBSE Assessment of Speaking and Listening Skills (ASL) Class 11 Code XI-L-01 Audio 1

CBSE

Assessment of Speaking and Listening (ASL)
Class 11 Code XI-L-01

Download ASL Marksheet in Excel Format 

Time: 45 min                                                                                                                         Max Marks: 20

Audio script Code 11-L-01 For Class 11

You will hear two students talk about children’s fashion. Read the sentences given in your worksheet, then listen to the conversation and choose ‘a’, ‘b’ or ‘c’ for each sentence.

 

Task 1                      5 marks

You will hear five people talk about children in the media. Read the statements given
in your worksheet, then listen to the extracts and match each statement A–G to each
speaker 1–5.There are two statements you do not need.
You will hear the recordings twice.

Speaker 1
Children working in films, advertisements or television shows miss out on daily school life and they are bound to regret it. I mean, what’s childhood without schooling? School life develops a child’s character and personality. At school, children not only develop their cognitive skills, but through group interactions they learn how to adjust to one another, resolve conflicts and develop social and emotional maturity. That’s probably one of the reasons why we insist our children have a right to education, isn’t it?

Speaker 2
I’m sure you’ll agree with me when I say talent shows are very challenging… physically as well as mentally. And we actually put children through them regularly. It’s really too much. Imagine the pressures of facing a camera…a live studio audience and endless elimination rounds…especially on days when you don’t feel up to it. Then there’s the pressure of dealing with a tough panel of judges made up of India’s Who’s Who…It’s so difficult on an adult, let alone a child!

Speaker 3
I don’t think children have a choice in the matter, you know. It’s all because of family pressure. I know of several instances where youngsters stand before the camera only due to ambitious parents. They heap their unrealised hopes and wishes on the child and dream of success…of making it big. Today, that means becoming rich and famous. The spiral of unending greed makes parents ruthless and manipulative. And more often than not, they spend the money faster than it’s earned.

Speaker 4
I wish somebody would conduct a study on this. Do you know the number of hours child
artistes work in a day? Have you seen their work contracts? Their work terms and conditions are never clearly defined or communicated at the outset. So children get exploited when it comes to the hours of work they put in, the number of performances they must complete and the amount they are paid for it. Most importantly, does anyone care about the children’s personal safety?

Speaker 5
This is an ever-present danger and nobody really cares. I worry about actors handling success at a tender age. You know, being a celebrity is a complex experience. Children are too young to understand that their celebrity status can be momentary. They may not be able to cope with real life once the popularity, the money or the fuss decline. Such difficult emotional and psychological tests can scar them for life. Haven’t we seen it happen to countless child stars around the world?

 

Task 2

You will hear two students talk about children’s fashion. Read the sentences given in your worksheet, then listen to the conversation and choose ‘a’, ‘b’ or ‘c’ for each sentence.

Boy: Hi, Paro! That’s a nice outfit you are wearing!

Girl: Thanks, Siddu! I designed it myself!

Boy: Really? Do you design clothes only for yourself?

Girl: Yes. At the moment! I hope to do a course in fashion designing in college and then open my own studio.

Boy: That’s nice! I was wondering, Paro… do you feel children today are getting very conscious of their looks and clothes?

Girl: Of course they are, Siddu! Thanks to all the ads and TV programmes, it’s all about new brands, new styles, the latest designs, and colours and cuts that matter.

Boy: Exactly! Why do you think this is happening?

Girl: I think it’s because youngsters today don’t want to be left behind. They want to fit in and be accepted, you know? They want to look as smart as their friends or their favourite media stars. Parents too, with rising incomes, only want the best for themselves as well as their children!

Boy: I agree. And what with these fancy new malls in every city, you know, the big stores located in bigger shopping complexes as well as the wonderful online shopping offers, buying’s never been made so easy before!

Girl: Yes. I agree. And it just shows children’s fashion has arrived to stay!

Boy: Yes…it’s become a huge industry in itself, hasn’t it?

Girl: Absolutely! We already have so many international clothes lines in the country. And they all have their miniature versions targetting children.

Boy: What’s ‘miniature version’, Paro?

Girl: Well, haven’t you seen shop windows with mannequins of adults and a child? The father, mother and child wear identical designs and colours…the same clothes…just a smaller version!

Boy: Yes! I’ve seen that! But, what about our own designers? Do they create clothes for children too?

Girl: That’s an interesting question, Siddu. I read an article about it recently. Do you know children’s wear by Indian designers is really different?

Boy : How’s that?

Girl : Well…unlike their international counterparts, Indian designers are very particular about using organic fibres, because they believe that’s best for the climate and the skin. So the feel of the cloth, the texture, is most important to them. And we all know what a variety we have from each state of our country. It’s a real gold mine!

Boy: Yes. Of course!

Girl: Another thing that sets our designers apart is that their children’s outfits are clothes which children can live in. Not only are they comfortable, but they’re also easy to maintain, you know? They’re all about wash-and-wear.

Boy: I see your point….makes complete sense in a hot country like ours.

Girl: Yes. And another thing is our home-grown designers are coming up with ways in which dressing can be fun! They are taking ideas from characters in our fables and mythology. Today, many mother-turned-designer entrepreneurs have added so much creativity to the designing of children’s clothes.

Boy: Really! That’s interesting to know! But…tell me…how do our designers stand in the face of competition from international designers?

Girl: Well…they’re doing just fine! And that’s because they are closely in tune with their buyers. These people know how we think and have a finger on the Indian pulse, you know? They know all our festivals, celebrations and the way we like to dress up!

Boy: You’re right! Come to think of it, our festivals are so full of life and colour…maybe that’s why our prints and clothes are so distinctive!

Task 3                   4 marks

You will hear a speech on peer education. Read the statements given in your worksheet,
then listen to the extract and choose four of the options A–G which are correct. Write
the correct letters in the blank boxes.

You will hear the recording twice.

Which FOUR of the following statements does the speaker believe to be true? Good morning, friends! It’s a pleasure to be with you, to share my thoughts on the benefits of peer education.

What is peer education? I would describe it as an effort by young people from a similar age group or social background to educate and inform each other on a wide variety of subjects. It is a form of role modelling values or behaviour that benefits a larger group.

Why do we need peer education? It’s rather obvious, isn’t it? Peers are friends who share the same life experiences. They are friends who can be trusted. Therefore, the information or advice they share is bound to be relevant and honest. Young people are more receptive to their peers and willing to absorb lessons from them.

Today, the benefits of peer teaching are being widely recognised and accepted because of their positive outcomes. For instance, when young people take charge of their learning, it allows qualities like commitment, loyalty and idealism to grow. Empathy and responsibility are two other valuable outcomes from dealing with peer group challenges and problems.

Letting students help themselves increases self-worth. Peer mentors are willing to go the
extra mile for their friends. They want to make things happen. They want their friends to win. The encouragement and faith helps low achievers become active and confident learners. The change happens from within and that’s really fantastic, isn’t it?

I have no doubt about it. When equals talk to each other without being judgemental and
decide on a course of action, it triggers deep-rooted behavioural change. Peer discussions are thus, a safe, yet dynamic way of learning and growing from shared experience.

I hope your peer education initiatives meet with the same outstanding success!

Good luck and thank you once again for the opportunity of sharing my views on this
topic today!

Task 4        5 marks

You will listen to two students, a boy and a girl, debate about reading e-books and
printed books. Read the sentences, then listen to the speakers and complete the sentences
with one or two words only.

You will hear the recording twice.

Girl: If you had to choose between an e-book and a printed book, what would it be, Nitin?

Boy: Well…I really love reading…nothing excites me more than settling down in my favourite corner with a new book! My idea of heaven would be a room lined with bookshelves… bursting with books to be read….printed books only! That’s the only thing I would wish for, Shoba!

Girl: But…who has that kind of space and time? Actually, I’m quite excited about these new books…the ones that can be read on screen. It’s amazing! A new kind of reading has arrived! What a boon for the book lover who can read efficiently without having to carry heavy volumes about…to me, the fact that books are easily portable with a reading device makes it a heaven-sent gift!

Boy: That may be, Shoba, but I don’t think your kind of books can replace real books…never! There’s something to be said about the texture of a book in your hands, isn’t there? Think of the charm of spending time just gazing at the cover of a book. Don’t tell me you didn’t do that as a child? Can you ever do the same thing with an e-book? I am sure not!

Girl: I don’t think you get it at all, Nitin. You see, e-books are a sign of changing times.
They are the best friends of today’s reader… they are topping sales around the world. This is the trend, you know…and studies show that it will continue to grow. Today, you can browse thousands of books in the digital format…and select the ones you want…in just a flash! That’s another reason why they are so popular worldwide.

Boy: Well…trends change as fast as they are formed…Let me tell you from experience,
children cannot be encouraged to read unless it holds their attention. As a child, I felt each book was a personal invitation extended only to me by the author… every detail of the book… the design, the illustrations, the story…all made a connection to ME. I can’t see this ever happening with an e-book…They are so impersonal…they just don’t have a ‘voice’, let alone
an appealing presence!


Girl: There’s nothing to say that e-books can’t be beautiful! After all, it’s still a growing
medium with really creative and talented artists and designers involved in it. There’s no
reason why the potential of books on screen can’t be further explored and developed. I firmly believe the only way forward is e-books. What a world of knowledge the reader has easy access to twenty-four seven…with just the simple click of a button!


Boy: Shoba, you’ve got to admit it. Virtual reading is a fleeting experience…it can never
linger in your mind. A real book is something sacred and to be treasured. It has lasting value. I would say a real book appeals to the senses and satisfies the soul. Nothing can replace that experience.


Girl: Oh well! We have our preferences and nothing’s going to change that, huh? Each to his or her own!

key 11 1

 Listening Worksheet 

CBSE Assessment of Speaking and Listening Skills (ASL)
Class XI Code XI-L-01
LISTENING TEST
Time: 45 min               Max. Marks: 20

Task 1                      5 marks

You will hear five people talk about children and life in the media. Read the statements below, then listen to the extracts and match each statement A-G to each speaker 1-5. There are two statements you do not need. You will hear the recordings twice.

worksheet 11 1

Task 2                    6 marks

You will hear two students talking about children’s fashion. Read the sentences below,
then listen to the conversation and choose ‘a’ or ‘b’ or ‘c’ for each sentence. You will hear
the recording twice.

1. The girl thinks that children’s fashion today is
a. mainly patronised by rich parents.
b. greatly advertised and popularised.
c. influenced and designed by children themselves.

2. The girl feels children are so aware of fashion because
a. of the presence of many stores and malls.
b. of easy online shopping options.
c. of the need to follow trends.

3. Many Indian designers like children to
a. dress like their parents.
b. be dressed in natural fabrics.
c. wear fabrics from their respective states.

4. The girl says Indian designers are different because they
a. create an awareness of the fabrics of India.
b. experiment with new designs and colours.
c. make comfortable and easy-to-maintain clothes.

5. New designers of children’s wear in India
a. use their imagination to great effect.
b. design similar clothes for parents and children.
c. revive ancient Indian weaving techniques.

6. Indian designers of children’s clothes are successful because they
a. work with local craftsmen and local fabrics.
b. know and understand the mindset of the Indian buyer.
c. have transformed dressing for important occasions.

Task 3                       4 marks

You will hear a speech on peer education. Read the statements below, then listen to the
extract and choose four of the options A–G which are correct. Write the correct letters in
the blank boxes. You will hear the recording twice.

Which FOUR of the following statements are true?

A. Peer lessons can cover academics, health, ethics and other teenage issues.
B. Peer educators are young students who volunteer to counsel adults.
C. Counselling by peers succeeds due to its authenticity and sensitivity.
D. Peer discussions move from pairs to small groups to larger groups.
E. Young people are motivated by the expectations of their peer educators.
F. Peer training may be done voluntarily or on a subsidised remuneration.
G. Open-minded peer dialogues can alter conduct, beliefs and attitude to life.

Task 4                      5 marks 

You will listen to two students, a boy and a girl, debate about reading e-books and printed books. Read the sentences, then listen to the speakers and complete the sentences with one or two words only. You will hear the recording twice.

1. The girl prefers to have a __________ library by reading on screen.
2. The boy likes the __________ of the pages against his fingers.
3. One can easily __________ and choose books when they are digitised.
4. The __________ made to the physical copy of a book, inspires the reading habit.
5. The __________ __________ of a book is only in its printed form.

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  1. Gaurav says:

    Please provide audio script of class task 2

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