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Essay on “Indian Fashion Trend” Complete Essay for Class 10, Class 12 and Graduation and other classes.

Essay No. 01

Indian Fashion Trend

Ancient Indian fashion garments generally used no stitching although Indians knew about sewing. Most clothes were ready to wear as soon as they left the loom. The traditional Indian

Dhoti, the Scarf or Uttariya, and the popular Turban are still visible India and continue to be part of Indian fashion. Likewise, for women, the Dhoti or the Sari as the lower garments, combined with a Stanapatta forms the basic ensemble, and once again consists of garments that do nor have to be stitched, the stanapatta being simply fastened in a knot at the back. And the Dhoti or the Sari worn covering both legs at the same time or, in the alternative, with one end of it passed between the legs and tucked at the back in the fashion that is still prevalent in large area of India. Indian men and women for these garments in the usually hot Indian climate.

Indian Sari remains the traditional clothing of Indian women. Worn in varied styles, it is a long piece of flat cotton, silk or Other fabric woven in different textures with different patterns. The sari has a lasting charm since it is not cut or tailored for a particular size. This graceful feminine attire can also be worn in several ways and its manner of wearing as well as its colour and texture are indicative of the status, age, occupation, region and religion of a woman. The tightly fitted, short blouse worn under a sari is called a choli. The choli evolved as a form of Indian clothing around the tenth century AD and the first cholis were only front covering; the back was always bare.

Another popular attire of women in Indian clothing is the Indian salwar-kameez. This popular Indian dress evolved as a comfortable and respectable garment for women in Kashmir and Punjab region, but is now immensely popular in all regions of India. Salwars are pyjama-like trousers drawn tightly in at the waist and the ankles. Over the salivary, women wear a long and loose tunic known as a kameez. One might occasionally come across women wearing a churidar instead of a salwar. A churidar is similar to the salwar but is tighter fitting at the hips, thighs and ankles. Over this, one might wear a collarless or mandarin-collar tunic called a kurta.

Though the majority of Indian women wear traditional Indian dresses, the men in India can be found in more conventional western clothing like shirts and trousers.

However, men in Indian villages are Still more comfortable in traditional attire like kurtas, lungis, dhotis and pyjamas. Indian dresses and Styles are marked by many variations, both religious and regional and one is likely to witness a plethora of colours, textures and styles in garments worn by the Indians.

Use of Gold in Indian Fashion: For this reason, some gold ornament is usually worn against the skin at all times. Indian Gold ornaments are popular because the metal is believed to have the power purify anything it touches. Ornaments of gold and other metals, often combined with precious and semi-precious gems and beads, are popular with both men and Women in India. Traditionally, Indian ornaments had economic significance for women too. The ornaments given to her at her wedding constituted a daughter’s inheritance from her father (Dowry). Customarily land and other property was divided among the sons, though this no longer holds true. In addition, a bride’s ornaments were financial security throughout her life.

 

Essay No. 02

 

Indian Fashion

Fashion is the prevailing style or custom. The fashion industry embraces both haute couture (clothes made by individual designers for a small and wealthy clientele), and garments produced on a wider commercial basis and sold in high-street shops, chain stores, and departmental stores, and by mail order. Indian fashion varies from one village to another village from one city to another city. India’s fashion heritage is rich in tradition, vibrant in colours and prepossessing. Ancient Indian fashion garments generally used no stitching although Indians knew about sewing. Most clothes were ready to wear as soon as they left the loom. The traditional Indian Dhoti, the scarf or uttariya, and the popular Turban are still visible India and continue to be part of Indian fashion. Likewise, for women, the dhoti or the sari as the lower garments, combined with a stanapatta forms the basic ensemble, and once again consists of garments that do not have to be stitched, the stanapatta being simply fastened in a knot at the back.

Indian sari is the most common dress among the Indian women. Worn in varied styles, it is a long piece of flat cotton, silk or other fabric woven in different textures with different patterns. The choli evolved as a form of Indian clothing around the tenth century AD and the first cholis were only front covering; the back was always bare. Another popular attire of women in Indian clothing is the Indian salwar-karneez. This popular Indian dress evolved as a comfortable and respectable garment for women in Kashmir and Punjab region, but is now immensely popular in all regions of India. Though the majority of Indian women wear traditional Indian dresses, the men in India can be found in more conventional western clothing like shirts and trousers. However, men in Indian villages are still more comfortable in traditional attire like kurtas, lungis, dhotis and pyjamas. Indian dresses & styles are marked by many variations, both religious and regional and one is likely to witness a plethora of colours, textures and styles in garments worn by the Indians. Some gold ornaments are usually worn against the skin at all times. Indian gold ornaments are popular because the metal is believed to have the power to purify anything it touches. Ornaments of gold and other metals, often combined with precious and semiprecious gems and beads, are popular with both men and women in India. Nose pin is a symbol of purity and marriage, though today many unmarried Indian girls wear this adornment. Necklaces are very popular fashion accessories across India amongst girls and women of all ages. Necklaces are made of a variety of materials, ranging from glass beads to gold and diamonds. One special necklace is the mangalasutra, worn only by married Indian women. It is the Indian equivalent of the western wedding ring. Bangles are worn on the wrist, bangles are believed to be protective bands and women always wore them as symbolic guards over their husbands. As with other ornaments, bangles today are worn by women of all ages all over India and are made of silver, gold, wood, glass, and plastic, among other materials. Rings, studs and other ornaments worn in the ears are popular all over the country. In fact, a girl’s ears are usually pierced before her first birthday. Other important ornaments are finger rings, toe rings and anklets.

Rings for the fingers are again, of various materials and designs and worn by unmarried and married women. Since the ring has become a common adornment, it is no longer considered a symbol in Indian marriages. Fashion in India offers several opportunities for Indian fashion designers. Indian fashion industry is growing every day. A fashion designer has to be creative. They have to express their designs in sketches. They need not be excellent artists but should be capable of combining tones, shades and colours. Dress designers need to have good imagination and an ability to think in three-dimension to translate into fashion what they can contemplate. Several fashion institutes like National Institute of Fashion Technology (NIFT), Indian Institute of Fashion Technology (IIFT) & Pearl Fashion Academy have been established where students lern to translate their creativity into dresses and fabric designs. New developments in computerization will enable the fashion industry to respond to the increasing demand for rapid style changes, the need for shorter production cycles, while allowing customers to select designs and within a short time have bespoke items delivered to their home.

 

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